Passing before my eyes…

What I’ve read in the past month or so:

Invitation to a Beheading – Vladimir Nabokov
American Genius – Lynne Tillman
Phallos – Samuel R. Delany
Faraway Places – Tom Spanbauer
Nightwood – Djuna Barnes

Lots of novels for a change. Nightwood is a re-read. Ages ago it seems, I used to come home and read, leaving the tv off. Perhps I’m coming to the end of my current viewing cycle. I’d be glad to return to the written word for a while.

0 Comments +

  1. Oooh, transvestite Irish doctors from San Francisco! Of course Djuna based her heroine on Nancy Cunard.

    Maude Cunard: “Tell me Nancy, what is it this time, Negroes or drugs?”

  2. Oooh, transvestite Irish doctors from San Francisco! Of course Djuna based her heroine on Nancy Cunard.

    Maude Cunard: “Tell me Nancy, what is it this time, Negroes or drugs?”

  3. Beheading has been on my nightstand for a year or more — since I heard of the underground women’s reading seminar in Tehran. That book was among their favorites. How dare I not have read it when they actually risk their heads, or at least their eyes, to do so?

  4. Beheading has been on my nightstand for a year or more — since I heard of the underground women’s reading seminar in Tehran. That book was among their favorites. How dare I not have read it when they actually risk their heads, or at least their eyes, to do so?

  5. Of course I had never heard of it until I read “Reading Lolita in Tehran”, which would have been the book preceding it on my list, if I had gone back two months. It’s an odd book, interesting to think that it was written at roughly the same time as Nightwood, since it shares a similar horror at the world of the late 20’s and a taste for the fantastic.

  6. Of course I had never heard of it until I read “Reading Lolita in Tehran”, which would have been the book preceding it on my list, if I had gone back two months. It’s an odd book, interesting to think that it was written at roughly the same time as Nightwood, since it shares a similar horror at the world of the late 20’s and a taste for the fantastic.

  7. A friend introduced me to her work in college and I’ve been obsessed ever since. If you haven’t yet, read Ryder.

    For that matter, Tillman’s “No Lease on Life” is brilliant and hilarious as well.

  8. A friend introduced me to her work in college and I’ve been obsessed ever since. If you haven’t yet, read Ryder.

    For that matter, Tillman’s “No Lease on Life” is brilliant and hilarious as well.

  9. Pale Fire is my favorite Nabokov, and he is my favorite writer–read his fiction! Big Chris and I keep meaning to read Invitation to a Beheading, thanks for the push. And lucky you with the Delaney…

  10. Pale Fire is my favorite Nabokov, and he is my favorite writer–read his fiction! Big Chris and I keep meaning to read Invitation to a Beheading, thanks for the push. And lucky you with the Delaney…

  11. Of course I had never heard of it until I read “Reading Lolita in Tehran”, which would have been the book preceding it on my list, if I had gone back two months. It’s an odd book, interesting to think that it was written at roughly the same time as Nightwood, since it shares a similar horror at the world of the late 20’s and a taste for the fantastic.

  12. A friend introduced me to her work in college and I’ve been obsessed ever since. If you haven’t yet, read Ryder.

    For that matter, Tillman’s “No Lease on Life” is brilliant and hilarious as well.

  13. Have yet to read “Pale Fire”, although I’ve picked it up often enough. I’ve actually read much more of Nabakov’s criticism than his novels, something that makes me vaguely embarrassed.

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